Hugh665

Hugh665
timelightbox:

Martha Holmes / TIME & LIFE Pictures
Jackson Pollock with his wife, artist Lee Krasner, in 1949.
In honor of the 100th anniversary of Pollock’s birth, TIME presents a gallery of the artist’s life. See more here.

timelightbox:

Martha Holmes / TIME & LIFE Pictures

Jackson Pollock with his wife, artist Lee Krasner, in 1949.

In honor of the 100th anniversary of Pollock’s birth, TIME presents a gallery of the artist’s life. See more here.

(via photographsonthebrain)

tattoolit:

Quoted in the book Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in America. “MOMA historian Russell Lynes summed up the rhetorical dialogue: “You call that art!” the public says (not asks) and the Museum replies in ringing tones “Yes, we call that art!”

tattoolit:

Quoted in the book Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in America. “MOMA historian Russell Lynes summed up the rhetorical dialogue: “You call that art!” the public says (not asks) and the Museum replies in ringing tones “Yes, we call that art!”

An Interview with the Batgirl of the SDCC panels

dcwomenkickingass:

There were lots of stories that came out of SDCC this year, but the one that has caught the attention of the comics community was a woman who dressed up as Batgirl to ask questions about female characters and creators at several DC Comics’ panels. I first became aware of her questions while following the live feeds of Newsarama and CBR. If you read this blog you know I have many of the same concerns she has. After seeing the reaction of some attendees and reporters about how her questions and those of others regarding female characters and creators were being handled, I compiled a post of that coverage.

That post has now become the most viewed ever for this blog. Her appearances at the panels has also generated other blog posts and many comments. She’s been called everything from a hero to a bully. But now for the first time we can hear from her.

Yesterday I caught up with Kyrax2, the “Batgirl woman” as she has become known, to find out more about what drove her to ask these questions and her thoughts on the reactions she received.

Read More

foreverla:

The Lakers (10-5) take on the Miami Heat (9-4) in Miami at 5:00PM PST on TNT. Wade is said to be out for the game. Lebron may play. Kobe will play. It should be fun. 

foreverla:

The Lakers (10-5) take on the Miami Heat (9-4) in Miami at 5:00PM PST on TNT. 

Wade is said to be out for the game. Lebron may play. Kobe will play. It should be fun. 

gq:

The Survivors: The Black Keys
Today’s exclusive Q+A is with frontman Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, who talks to GQ’s Devin Gordon about (finally) leaving Akron, his bandmate’s rough romantic life, and the MTV video music award trophy they received that was made out to “The Black-Eyed Peas.” Tomorrow at GQ.com: Jim James of My Morning Jacket.

Do you think the word “survivors”—our theme for this portfolio—accurately applies to you and Pat? Dan Auerbach: Um, do we feel like survivors? Well, I don’t know. It’s a little over-the-top, you know what I mean? I wouldn’t use the term survivor. Like, my uncle was a survivor. He survived the Holocaust. Me? I’m a fucking musician. I play music. I got lucky.
GQ: Maybe persistence is more like it.Dan Auerbach: Yeah. Persistence. There you go. Hard-headedness.
GQ: Why have you guys managed to stick together for so long?Dan Auerbach: I don’t want to be a dickhead, but honestly, it’s because we’re good and because we’ve worked harder than any band I’ve ever met, without a question. We’ve toured harder and done more dates and played for less money. Not mixing a record over and over again, trying to change and grow. But I’ve got to say: it’s probably easier to change and grow when there’s just two of us. Everybody is always like, “Beck is such a chameleon.” And I’m always like, “Of course he’s a fucking chameleon. Nobody tells him what to do. He has to answer to no one—he can do whatever he wants, whenever.” And I think that when you’re in a group, it’s harder to change, because you’ve got to pull everybody with you. Pat and I—you’ve just got to convince one person to try something.

[Photograph by Mark Seliger]

gq:

The Survivors: The Black Keys

Today’s exclusive Q+A is with frontman Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, who talks to GQ’s Devin Gordon about (finally) leaving Akron, his bandmate’s rough romantic life, and the MTV video music award trophy they received that was made out to “The Black-Eyed Peas.” Tomorrow at GQ.com: Jim James of My Morning Jacket.

Do you think the word “survivors”—our theme for this portfolio—accurately applies to you and Pat?
Dan Auerbach: Um, do we feel like survivors? Well, I don’t know. It’s a little over-the-top, you know what I mean? I wouldn’t use the term survivor. Like, my uncle was a survivor. He survived the Holocaust. Me? I’m a fucking musician. I play music. I got lucky.

GQ: Maybe persistence is more like it.
Dan Auerbach: Yeah. Persistence. There you go. Hard-headedness.

GQ: Why have you guys managed to stick together for so long?
Dan Auerbach: I don’t want to be a dickhead, but honestly, it’s because we’re good and because we’ve worked harder than any band I’ve ever met, without a question. We’ve toured harder and done more dates and played for less money. Not mixing a record over and over again, trying to change and grow. But I’ve got to say: it’s probably easier to change and grow when there’s just two of us. Everybody is always like, “Beck is such a chameleon.” And I’m always like, “Of course he’s a fucking chameleon. Nobody tells him what to do. He has to answer to no one—he can do whatever he wants, whenever.” And I think that when you’re in a group, it’s harder to change, because you’ve got to pull everybody with you. Pat and I—you’ve just got to convince one person to try something.

[Photograph by Mark Seliger]